Green Mountain Animal Defenders

Green Mountain Animal Defenders

Working to Protect the Well-Being of All Animals Since 1983

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Wildlife

Bird

Green Mountain Animal Defenders strives to educate the public about appropriate human-wildlife interactions. We are deeply appreciative of the many inquiries we receive concerning injured or orphaned wild animals or humane solutions for conflicts with wildlife, and offer the guidance below on responding to emergency wildlife situations and coexisting peacefully with wildlife. Our hope is that the guidance will help to ensure that human-wildlife interactions are safe for all involved.

Sick, Injured, or Orphaned Animals

Finding a wild animal in peril can evoke strong emotions and an urge to take action. However, you may not know what to do. While your compassionate nature may entice you to nurture the animal yourself, this could actually harm the animal and may even be illegal. In Vermont, only licensed wildlife rehabilitators are legally allowed to possess wildlife. If you find a wild animal in danger, contact a wildlife rehabilitator immediately.

Guidance by species can be found at Wildlife Rescue Inc.

Rabies

Raccoons, bats, skunks, and foxes are the primary carriers of rabies in New England. If you find an animal that you think may have rabies, do not approach the animal. Instead contact a licensed "rabies vector" wildlife rehabilitator immediately.

Deer

Deer

If you hit a deer while driving or see an injured one, contact the State Police and a Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department game warden. The animal may have to be euthanized, but this can be more humane than simply abandoning the animal.

Human-Wildlife Conflicts

There are many humane solutions and useful tips to avoid or resolve problems that may occur when wildlife gets into your home, workplace or garden.

For professional solutions in Vermont, contact HEART Wildlife Removal - Humane Eviction and Removal at (802) 651-6863

Hunting and Trapping

Green Mountain Animal Defenders opposes the exploitation of animals through hunting. We disagree with the premise that hunting is a form of wildlife conservation. We also oppose the use of cruel and indiscriminate body-gripping traps.

Becoming a Wildlife Rehabilitator

If you are interested in becoming a wildlife rehabilitator in Vermont, find out how and contact us — we may be able to assist you.

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Found Injured / Orphaned Wildlife?

Report Animal Cruelty

Action Alerts

Meatless Monday

Participate in Our Pet Food Drive

Take a Fur-Free Pledge

Urge Restaurants Not to Serve Foie Gras

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